ISE News and Events

Orkun Baycik is an honorable mention at the IISE Annual conference Doctorial Colloquium for her poster titled, “Interdicting Layered Physical and Information Flow Networks ”Orkun’s research focuses on an interdiction problem on two interdependent networks. In this bi-level program, the objective of the defender is to maximize the physical flow and the objective of the attacker is to minimize this maximum amount. The existence of interdependencies results in a discrete inner problem. They reformulate this problem using duality and obtain a single-level formulation.

The class of 2017 graduates and their families celebrated their graduation in the annual ISE graduation luncheon on May 18. The 2017 ISE graduates are spreading their wings in a wide variety of companies and organizations, including Deloitte, IBM, Fidelity, Global Foundaries, US Navy, and others.The Delmar W. Karger Master's Outstanding Thesis Award is given to Felipe Ortiz (Advisor: Prof.

Uzma Mushtaque is an honorable mention at the IISE Annual conference Doctorial Colloquium for her poster titled, “Context-dependent Discrete Choice Models and Assortment Optimization”Uzma’s primary goal of her research is to formulate decision tools that consider a system level approach when dealing with personalized customer preferences in an e-commerce environment. Her research is at the intersection of: (1) customer preference models (2) recommender systems, and (3) assortment planning.

Congratulations to Master's Graduate Felipe Ortiz and Professor Sharkey on receiving the Best Security Engineering Track Paper Award at the IISE Annual Meeting.

Congratulations to Ni Ni for being awarded the Rack Manufacturers Institute/John Nofsinger Honor Scholarship for the 2017-18 academic year from the Material Handling Education Foundation, Inc.

Institute News

Powerful hurricanes and earthquakes have wreaked havoc in the United States and around the world in recent years, often leaving people stranded for months and even years without access to water, food, and shelter. A unique collaborative project at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute seeks to provide a sustainable solution, while also considering the environment.
Heat pipes are devices to keep critical equipment from overheating. They transfer heat from one point to another through an evaporation-condensation process and are used in everything from cell phones and laptops to air conditioners and spacecraft.   Normally, heat pipes contain porous metal wicks that return liquid to the heated end of the pipe where it evaporates. But engineers are working to develop wickless heat pipes that are lighter and more reliable. Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute initiated the Constrained Vapor Bubble (CVB) project to study these wickless heat pipes for use in near-zero gravity environments for aerospace applications.  
Aquaporins are proteins that serve as water channels to regulate the flow of water across biological cell membranes. They also remove excess salt and impurities in the body, and it is this aspect that has led to much interest in recent years in how to mimic the biochemical processes of aquaporins potentially for water desalination systems.   An international team of researchers co-led by Georges Belfort has discovered water, in the form of “water wires,” contained in another molecule—the imidazole—a nitrogen-based organic compound that could be used as a potential building block for artificial aquaporins. The findings were recently published in Science Advances by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Belfort is Institute Professor and professor of chemical and biological engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.
Nanomaterials expert Ganpati Ramanath, the John Tod Horton ’52 Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has been named a fellow of the Materials Research Society (MRS) “for developing creative approaches to realize new nanomaterials via chemically directed nanostructure synthesis and assembly and for tailoring interfaces in electronics and energy applications using molecular nanolayers.”
Jennifer Pazour, assistant professor of industrial and systems engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has been named an inaugural recipient of the Johnson & Johnson Women in STEM2D (WiSTEM2D) Scholars Award.